Alex Wright & Jack Norris

Rebuilding the past and visualising the future: Immersive technologies in heritage
Venue:
Coopers' Loft
Price:
£3
Duration:
1 Hour

Please note: this talk has been postponed.

If you have already purchased a ticket, click here for information.


How immersive mixed reality technologies, including projection mapping, AR and VR can be deployed to illustrate the past and bring it to life, as well as helping to imagine and visualise the way forward in the future.

Bristol Old Vic has utilised projection mapping – in their 250th birthday celebrations, as well as in the permanent foyer installation The House is Open, as well as augmented reality – in their publicly available app A Window to the Past - to tell their history. We’ll look at these examples as well as talk about the further potential of these digital mediums for heritage communication.

Alex Wright is a founding director of bristol based digital design studio Limbic Cinema which created the projection mapping pieces for the theatre and collaborated with Zubr on A Window to the Past.

Jack Norris is Managing Director at Zubr, the bristol based VR and AR design studio and directed the app development for the theatre alongside Limbic Cinema

Memory of Theatre

An oral histories project
Venue:
Coopers' Loft
Price:
£3
Duration:
1 Hour

The memory of theatre project was created as part of Bristol Old Vic’s programme to preserve, celebrate and share its more than 250 year history.

As part of this project we are collecting memories from people who have been involved with the theatre throughout its history, from actors to directors to ushers to audience members.

In this event we will talk more about the project, explore some of the memories that have been collected so far and offer the audience the chance to share some of their own memories. 

Elaine McGirr

Sarah Siddons and the making of modern celebrity
Venue:
Coopers' Loft
Price:
£3
Duration:
1 Hour

Celebrity actors are defined by their parts; both the iconic characters they play and their equally iconic physical characteristics. What scholars of celebrity call 'public intimacy' – the illusion that one can really know a celebrity only seen on stage or in the press – is created through performance. Performance makes character legible and it makes the celebrity real – it is where fantasy and flesh meet. This talk will explore how Sarah Siddons, who would become the greatest theatrical celebrity of the eighteenth century, honed her craft – and her character – in Bristol and Bath. Her relationship with her audiences in Bristol allowed her to become a national – not just a London – celebrity.

Elaine McGirr is the Professor of Eighteenth-Century Studies and Head of Theatre at the University of Bristol. Recent publications include: Nell Gwyn’s Breasts and Colley Cibber’s Shirts: Celebrity Actors and their Famous ‘Parts’ (2016), What’s in a Name?: Romeo and Juliet and the Cibber Brand (2017), and New Lines: Mary Ann Yates, The Orphan of China, and the new she-tragedy (2018)

Andrew Foyle

The most rewarding street in Bristol
Venue:
Coopers' Loft
Price:
£3
Duration:
1 Hour

Rubbish dump; defensive wall and ditch; the town's marsh; militia training ground; venue for a Royal pageant; and desirable residential development named after the restored monarch Charles II. The district around King Street has been reinvented many times over the centuries, before it became host to the Theatre Royal in the 1760s. The Bristol writer and buildings historian Andrew Foyle will give an illustrated talk uncovering some of the architectural treasures resulting from this richly varied story. The talk will cover a random selection of buildings old and new in King Street and its surrounds (but not the Theatre Royal itself), each adding its own distinct flavour to the area’s heritage.

Andrew Foyle is the author of two volumes in the Pevsner Guides series; Bristol (City Guide, 2004) and the revised Buildings of England for Somerset North and Bristol (2011). He studied architectural history at the University of Bristol and the Courtauld Institute of Art, winning the Hawksmoor Medal in 1998. He teaches courses in art history and architecture and delivers walks, lectures and seminars to audiences including University College Oxford, Trinity College Dublin, SPAB, The Georgian Group and the Victorian Society. Andrew now works as a freelance architectural historian based in North Somerset.